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Porcelain Hotel

por·ce·lain | \ ˈpȯr-s(ə-)lən \ Definition of porcelain 1: a hard, fine-grained, sonorous, nonporous, and usually translucent and white ceramic ware that consists essentially of kaolin, quartz, and a feldspathic rock and is fired at a high temperature.

Long clays are cohesive sticky and have high plasticity; short clays are less cohesive and have lower plasticity. Both the raw materials and the process parameters milling time and forming pressure, for example can be adjusted to achieve desired quality. After the influential Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, art pottery became a serious business in America.

por·ce·lain / ˈpôrs(ə)lən / • n. a white vitrified translucent ceramic; oldsmobileclub.ga also hard-paste, soft-paste. ∎ (usu. porcelains) articles made of this. ∎ such articles collectively: a collection of Chinese porcelain. DERIVATIVES: por·ce·la·ne·ous / ˌpôrsəˈlānēəs / adj. por·cel·la·nous / -əs / adj.
Classification of the type of porcelain employed in inlays and crowns is based on the fusion temperature of the porcelain: high fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C); medium fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C); and low fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C).
por·ce·lain | \ ˈpȯr-s(ə-)lən \ Definition of porcelain 1: a hard, fine-grained, sonorous, nonporous, and usually translucent and white ceramic ware that consists essentially of kaolin, quartz, and a feldspathic rock and is fired at a high temperature.
por·ce·lain / ˈpôrs(ə)lən / • n. a white vitrified translucent ceramic; oldsmobileclub.ga also hard-paste, soft-paste. ∎ (usu. porcelains) articles made of this. ∎ such articles collectively: a collection of Chinese porcelain. DERIVATIVES: por·ce·la·ne·ous / ˌpôrsəˈlānēəs / adj. por·cel·la·nous / -əs / adj.
por·ce·lain | \ ˈpȯr-s(ə-)lən \ Definition of porcelain 1: a hard, fine-grained, sonorous, nonporous, and usually translucent and white ceramic ware that consists essentially of kaolin, quartz, and a feldspathic rock and is fired at a high temperature.
por·ce·lain

Apr 14,  · porcelain (countable and uncountable, plural porcelains) (usually uncountable) A hard, white, translucent ceramic that is made by firing kaolin and other materials; china. (usually countable) Anything manufactured from this material.

It was noted for its great resistance to thermal shock ; a visitor to the factory in Böttger's time reported having seen a white-hot teapot being removed from the kiln and dropped into cold water without damage. Although widely disbelieved this has been replicated in modern times. The pastes produced by combining clay and powdered glass frit were called Frittenporzellan in Germany and frita in Spain.

In France they were known as pâte tendre and in England as "soft-paste". Experiments at Rouen produced the earliest soft-paste in France, but the first important French soft-paste porcelain was made at the Saint-Cloud factory before Soft-paste factories were established with the Chantilly manufactory in and at Mennecy in The Vincennes porcelain factory was established in , moving to larger premises at Sèvres [25] in Doccia porcelain of Florence was founded in and remains in production, unlike Capodimonte porcelain which was moved from Naples to Madrid by its royal owner , after producing from After a gap of 15 years Naples porcelain was produced from to , specializing in Neoclassical styles.

All these were very successful, with large outputs of high-quality wares. In and around Venice , Francesco Vezzi was producing from around to ; survivals are very rare, but less so than from the Hewelke factory, which only lasted from to The Cozzi factory fared better, lasting from to The Le Nove factory produced from about to , then was revived from to The first soft-paste in England was demonstrated by Thomas Briand to the Royal Society in and is believed to have been based on the Saint-Cloud formula.

In , Thomas Frye took out a patent on a porcelain containing bone ash. This was the first bone china , subsequently perfected by Josiah Spode. In the twenty-five years after Briand's demonstration, a number of factories were founded in England to make soft-paste table-wares and figures:.

William Cookworthy discovered deposits of kaolin in Cornwall , making a considerable contribution to the development of porcelain and other whiteware ceramics in the United Kingdom. Cookworthy's factory at Plymouth , established in , used kaolin and china stone to make porcelain with a body composition similar to that of the Chinese porcelains of the early 18th century. Hard-paste porcelain came from East Asia, specifically China, and some of the finest quality porcelain wares are from this category.

Kaolinite, feldspar and quartz or other forms of silica continue to constitute the basic ingredients for most continental European hard-paste porcelains. Soft-paste porcelains date back from the early attempts by European potters to replicate Chinese porcelain by using mixtures of clay and frit. Soapstone and lime were known to have been included in these compositions.

These wares were not yet actual porcelain wares as they were not hard nor vitrified by firing kaolin clay at high temperatures. As these early formulations suffered from high pyroplastic deformation, or slumping in the kiln at high temperatures, they were uneconomic to produce and of low quality. Formulations were later developed based on kaolin with quartz, feldspars, nepheline syenite or other feldspathic rocks.

These were technically superior, and continue to be produced. Soft-paste porcelains are fired at lower temperatures than hard-paste porcelain, therefore these wares are generally less hard than hard-paste porcelains. Although originally developed in England in [40] in order to compete with imported porcelain, bone china is now made worldwide. The English had read the letters of Jesuit missionary Francois Xavier d'Entrecolles , which described Chinese porcelain manufacturing secrets in detail.

Porcelain and other ceramic materials have many applications in engineering, especially ceramic engineering. Porcelain is an excellent insulator for use at high voltage , especially in outdoor applications, see Insulator electricity Material.

Porcelain can be used as a building material , usually in the form of tiles or large rectangular panels. Modern porcelain tiles are generally produced by a number of recognised international standards and definitions. The Revolution Is Only Beginning. Because of its durability, inability to rust and impermeability, glazed porcelain has been in use for personal hygiene since at least the third quarter of the 17th century. During this period, porcelain chamber pots were commonly found in higher-class European households, and the term "bourdaloue" was used as the name for the pot.

However bath tubs are not made of porcelain, but of porcelain enamel on a metal base, usually of cast iron. Porcelain enamel is a marketing term used in the US, and is not porcelain but vitreous enamel.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the ceramic material. For other uses, see Porcelain disambiguation. This is a dynamic list and may never be able to satisfy particular standards for completeness. You can help by expanding it with reliably sourced entries. Retrieved 18 Jun Art, elegance, and appreciation.

Archived from the original on Columbia Encyclopedia Sixth Edition. Studies in Chinese ceramics. The Genius of China: Their Origins, Chemistry, and Recreation. Looking at European ceramics: Paul Getty Museum Journal.

Science in the enlightenment: Products for a civilised society. News from a radiant future: Soviet porcelain from the collection of Craig H. Recent patents have been issued to Japanese and American companies in the area of electrical insulators and dental prostheses. Ceramics of the World: From Four Thousand b. Ceramics, Industrial Processing and Testing. Iowa State University Press, Cite this article Pick a style below, and copy the text for your bibliography.

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Benjamin Franklin viewed the domestic manufacture of porcelain as an important step toward economic independence from England, and it ultimately became intimately linked with the industrialization of the nation. However, its production in the United States was never as crucial as stoneware and redware production. Porcelain, first made in China during the Tang dynasty — a. It was not until and , after the German ceramist Johann Friedrich Böttger had discovered its secret, kaolin, that true hard-paste porcelain was produced outside of China.

In , Andrew Duché of Savannah, Georgia, made the first recorded piece of porcelain in North America , "a small teacup … very near transparent. Other ventures followed in Philadelphia. By the mids, Parian ware, a type of porcelain having the appearance of marble, became so popular that no fashionable Victorian parlor would be without a piece or two. From the s on, Belleek, a light, marvelously thin, ivory-colored porcelain variant of Parian, named after its Irish town of origin, became the greatest American ceramics success story.

After the influential Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia, art pottery became a serious business in America. Porcelain, while a minor branch of the industry, had its champions in M.

By the s, porcelain found wide application in industry and began to be studied at colleges, universities, and art schools such as Cranbrook.

An intense interest in porcelain continues. The Collection of Everson Museum of Art. The Metropolitan Museum of Art , Porcelain was first made by the Chinese to withstand the great heat generated in certain parts of their kilns.

The two natural substances used were kaolin, also known as china clay , a white clay free of impurities that melts only at very high temperature, and a feldspar mineral called petuntse that forms a glassy cement, binding the vessel permanently. Although proto-porcelain wares exist dating from the Shang, by the Eastern Han high firing glazed ceramic wares had developed into porcelain, and porcelain manufactured during the T'ang period — was exported to the Islamic world where it was highly prized.

The ware was refined during the Sung period — During the Yuan period — , blue and white ware was produced by utilizing cobalt blue from the Middle East. The Ming period — developed this blue and white ware but used other colors as well.

The Ch'ing period — designed porcelain especially for export often utilizing Western designs. In Europe porcelain was first commercially produced in Meissen, Germany. Most of the European porcelain is soft paste made from clay and an artificial compound such as ground glass and is not as strong as the Chinese hard-paste porcelain.

Savage, Porcelain through the Ages , repr. Litchfield, Pottery and Porcelain 6th ed. Valenstein, A Handbook of Chinese Ceramics Porcelain is used for tableware, decorative objects, laboratory equipment, and electrical insulators.

It was developed by the Chinese in the 7th or 8th century. Soft-paste porcelain is made of clay and powdered glass, fired at a low temperature, lead glazed, and refired. See also hard-paste , soft-paste. The earliest forms in -ana , -an are It. The kilns of the Yue region produced greenish-colored porcelain well known for its hardness and craftsmanship.

Tang porcelain from the kilns of Xing is white and known for its strength and elegant shapes. What made you want to look up porcelain? Please tell us where you read or heard it including the quote, if possible. Test Your Knowledge - and learn some interesting things along the way.

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free! Etymology on the cutting edge. A look at its gassy origins. Smart advice on modifying adjectives. And is one way more correct than the others?

The story of an imaginary word that managed to sneak past our editors and enter the dictionary. How to use a word that literally drives some people nuts. The awkward case of 'his or her'. Words to improve your Scrabble game. Test your vocabulary with our question quiz! Examples of porcelain in a Sentence The bowl is made of porcelain. Recent Examples on the Web My diagnosis was followed by extractions, titanium implants in my jaw, installation of porcelain teeth on the implants, bone grafts, a series of gum surgeries -- and that was just the beginning.

I found myself in a salon with a very well-painted, highly varnished floor; chairs and sofas covered with white draperies, a green porcelain stove, walls hung with pictures in gilt frames, a gilt pendule and other ornaments on the mantelpiece, a large lustre pendent from the centre of the ceiling, mirrors, consoles, muslin curtains, and a handsome centre table completed the inventory of furniture. Classification of the type of porcelain employed in inlays and crowns is based on the fusion temperature of the porcelain: high fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C); medium fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C); and low fusing, °F to °F (°C to °C). por·ce·lain - a white vitrified translucent ceramic Porcelain tiles are composed of clay, silica, sand and feldspar. They are formed with pressure and heat and fired at much higher rates than ceramic tile.